Savage: Police Officer Taunts Gunman By Bringing Lube Into The Courtroom.

    

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The Florida Police Officer who was shot 3 times by Kevin Rojas who had the intention to kill him showed up to Rojas’s sentencing hearing with a jar of lube with a special message for the criminal.

  

VIDEO AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PAGE:

   

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The judge generally sits behind a raised desk, known as the bench. Behind the judge are the great seal of the jurisdiction and the flags of the appropriate federal and state governments. Judges usually wear a plain black robe (a requirement in many jurisdictions). An exception was the late U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist, who broke tradition by adorning his robe with four gold stripes on each sleeve. (Rehnquist reportedly said that he had been inspired to add the stripes by his having seen such stripes worn by the character of the judge, in a local production of the Gilbert and Sullivan comic operatic spoof of British jurisprudence, “Trial by Jury.”)

   

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Adjacent to the bench are the witness stand and the desks where the court clerk and the court reporter sit. The courtroom is divided into two parts by a barrier known as the bar. The bar may be an actual railing, or an imaginary barrier. The bailiff stands (or sits) against one wall and keeps order in the courtroom.

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On one side is the judge’s bench, the tables for the plaintiff, the defendant, and their respective counsel, and a separate group of seats known as the jury box where the jury sits (in jurisdictions that allow for jury trials). Apart from the parties to the case and any witnesses, only the lawyers can literally pass the bar (court personnel and jury members usually enter through separate doors), and this is the reason why the term “the bar” has come to refer to the legal profession as a whole (see bar association). There is usually a podium or lectern between the two tables where the lawyers may stand when they argue their case before the judge.

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There is usually an open space between the bench and the counsel tables, because of the court clerk and court reporter’s tables in front of the bench and the jury box on the side. This space is called the well. It is extremely disrespectful to the court for persons who are not court employees to directly “traverse the well” without permission—that is, to walk directly towards the bench across the well—and some courts have rules expressly forbidding this.[1] Instead, if documents need to be given to or taken from the judge, attorneys are normally expected to approach the court clerk or bailiff, who acts as an intermediary. During trials, attorneys will ask the court’s permission to traverse the well or “approach the bench” for “sidebar” conferences with the judge.