He’s Back! The Most Badazz Nick Diaz Tribute Ever Created, Legalize Diaz.

    

https://i1.wp.com/i.ytimg.com/vi/g1On149iiEU/maxresdefault.jpg?w=1060&ssl=1

With UFC Superstar Nick Diaz coming back and looking for a major fight soon, let us enjoy this masterpiece created by highlight video extraordinaire Bratt Mamley entitled “Legalize Diaz”

   

VIDEO AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PAGE:

     

https://i0.wp.com/cdn.lowkickmma.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Nick-Diaz.jpg?w=1060

Nicholas Robert “Nick” Diaz (born August 2, 1983) is an American professional mixed martial artist who was last signed with the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC). Since beginning his career in 2001, Diaz has competed in UFC, PRIDE, Strikeforce, EliteXC, World Extreme Cagefighting (WEC), DREAM, and Shooto. He is a former welterweight champion in Strikeforce and WEC, and is the older brother of Nate Diaz. Diaz, who is of Mexican and English descent, was born and raised in Stockton, California. Diaz attended Tokay High School in Lodi, California, for a year before dropping out.

https://i1.wp.com/cdn.vox-cdn.com/thumbor/eJ52ifu68-BPjx8IrogVWB3o0zg=/1400x788/filters:format(jpeg)/cdn.vox-cdn.com/assets/2635975/210_Nick_Diaz_gallery_post.jpg?w=1060&ssl=1

While a freshman, he was a member of the swim team. Diaz began training in karate and aikido from a young age and also participated in wrestling tournaments during his teenage years. He started training in Sambo at the age of 16 under Bulgarian National Sambo Champion Valeri Ignatov.[4] He was promoted to black belt in Brazilian jiu-jitsu by Cesar Gracie on May 8, 2007. Diaz currently teaches Brazilian jiu-jitsu with his brother Nathan in Lodi, California. Both Diaz brothers are advocates for cannabis.

https://i2.wp.com/cdn.vox-cdn.com/thumbor/r5jdVJGPHhpyCQrP_9Eysaepv4o=/0x0:1100x733/1200x800/filters:focal(0x0:1100x733)/cdn.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_image/image/50262627/039_Nick_Diaz.1363384683.0.jpg?w=1060&ssl=1

Diaz appears in the feature-length documentary Fight Life (2013), which chronicles the lives of mixed martial artists outside the cage; the film is directed by independent filmmaker James Z. Feng and won the Best Documentary Award at the United Film Festival. Diaz became a professional mixed martial arts fighter in 2001 just after his 18th birthday and won his first fight, submitting Mike Wick with a triangle choke at IFC Warriors Challenge 15.[11] Diaz would become a champion in just his second professional fight, defeating Chris Lytle for the IFC Welterweight Championship in July 2002 at IFC Warriors Challenge 17.

https://i1.wp.com/www.tsn.ca/polopoly_fs/1.364855!/fileimage/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_620/nick-diaz.jpg?w=1060&ssl=1

Diaz was then invited to participate in Ultimate Athlete’s King of the Mountain, a single-night tournament that took place two months later. He won his first two fights[13][14] but eventually lost in the finals to Jeremy Jackson by TKO.[15] Diaz would fight in Warriors Quest and Shooto against Harris “Hitman” Sarmiento and Kuniyoshi Hironaka respectively before defending his IFC Welterweight Championship and winning the WEC Welterweight Championship in 2003 at WEC 6, submitting Joe Hurley with a kimura.

https://i2.wp.com/i.ytimg.com/vi/46EsA9Iop3Q/hqdefault.jpg?w=1060&ssl=1

Diaz returned to defend his IFC Welterweight Championship against the man who defeated him one year earlier, Jeremy Jackson at IFC Warriors Challenge 18. This bout was for Diaz’ IFC United States Welterweight Championship, Jackson’s IFC Americas Welterweight Championship and the vacant ISKA-MMA Americas Welterweight Championship. Diaz won the rematch via TKO in the first round.[17] Taking notice of his success, the UFC signed Diaz over the summer and he made his debut at UFC 44, completing the trilogy against Jackson and submitting him with an armbar in the last round of a back-and-forth fight that Diaz appeared to be winning on the scorecards.

https://i2.wp.com/img.maximummedia.ie/sportsjoe_ie/eyJkYXRhIjoie1widXJsXCI6XCJodHRwOlxcXC9cXFwvbWVkaWEtc3BvcnRzam9lLm1heGltdW1tZWRpYS5pZS5zMy5hbWF6b25hd3MuY29tXFxcL3dwLWNvbnRlbnRcXFwvdXBsb2Fkc1xcXC8yMDE3XFxcLzAyXFxcLzAxMTQ1MzA0XFxcL05pY2stRGlhei1wbGFuLUIuanBnXCIsXCJ3aWR0aFwiOjc2NyxcImhlaWdodFwiOjQzMSxcImRlZmF1bHRcIjpcImh0dHBzOlxcXC9cXFwvd3d3LnNwb3J0c2pvZS5pZVxcXC9hc3NldHNcXFwvaW1hZ2VzXFxcL3Nwb3J0c2pvZVxcXC9uby1pbWFnZS5wbmc_dj01XCJ9IiwiaGFzaCI6ImI5MmZiNjhiODQyODY2YmZlNWQ0ZWNmZjhiYmRmNTUzMGI4MGIwYmMifQ==/nick-diaz-plan-b.jpg?w=1060&ssl=1

Diaz returned to the Octagon at UFC 47, set to take on highly touted future EliteXC Middleweight Champion Robbie Lawler. Lawler was a heavy favorite coming into the fight but it was Diaz who took the offensive, chasing Lawler around the cage for the majority of the bout. In the second round, Diaz taunted Lawler, who swung wildly and missed, allowing Diaz to connect with a right hook that knocked Lawler out.[19] Diaz was then matched up with judoka Karo Parisyan at UFC 49, but ended up losing a hard-fought split decision.